Tekniska Museet
100 Innovations - Tekniska museet

An exhibition at the National Museum of Science and Technology in Stockholm, 2012 – 2018

The washing machine

The washing machine

Ingress för att beskriva innovationen

The washing machine

A common laundry room in Sweden in the 1930s. Photo: Archives of National Museum of Science and Technology.

The washing machine

Naturewash was developed by Zhengpeng Li and utilizes negative ions to clean clothes. Photo: Electrolux.

Kort fakta om innovationen

Kort fakta (2) om innovationen

Rubrik för små genier

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The washing machine

In earlier times people washed by hand. Or strictly speaking — women washed by hand. Thanks to the washing machine women had more freedom to educate themselves and perhaps had a little more leisure time.

The first washing machines were made of wood and cranked by hand at the end of the 1700s. The first washing machines for home use arrived in the 1900s. In 1950 eight per cent of Swedish households had access to a laundry room, in 1965 the figure was 90 %.

A washing machine has a motor and a gearbox which makes the drum inside the machine spin. The drum has crinkles which lift up the washing so that it is rubbed. Nowadays we also have smart washing detergents with enzymes which are good at dissolving stubborn stains.

Rubrik för nördar

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