Tekniska Museet
100 Innovations - Tekniska museet

An exhibition at the National Museum of Science and Technology in Stockholm, 2012 – 2018

The electricity

Electricity

Ingress för att beskriva innovationen

The electricity

We might need electric power while out walking in the forest. GPS can be useful if one gets lost, for example. Photo: Ellinor Algin.

The electricity

Toggle switches such as the one in this photo were in use during the 1930s. Photo: Anna Gerdén.

Kort fakta om innovationen

Kort fakta (2) om innovationen

Rubrik för små genier

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Electricity

No lighting, no computers, no coffee and perhaps no heat. A day without electricity is quiet, dark and boring. Naturally occurring electricity was already discovered in ancient times. They observed flashes of lightning in the sky and also noticed that hair for example could become electrically charged. At the end of the 1800s we first learned to generate and transport electricity. Appliances powered by electricity began to be mass-produced and today we are totally dependent on electricity.

Electric current is a flow of tiny particles called electrons. They can move in metals and flow in cables from the power plant to your computer. The national grid supplies the whole of Sweden with electricity. If the cables are cut off and the link is lost a power failure occurs.

Rubrik för nördar

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See photographs from the museum's image archives on Flickr.

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Bambuser

Live streaming from the museum's nerd cafés and seminars. Watch live or in retrospect.

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